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This American Sign Language cover of Adele’s ‘Hello’ is the most stunning thing I’ve seen all week.

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When Adele’s latest single “Hello” dropped, people were having feelings.

Lots of feelings.

When @adele puts out a new single… She’s done it again! #Hello #25 #SheHadMeAtHello
A photo posted by Kate Hudson (@katehudson) on

Adele explained that “Hello” is “not about an ex-relationship, a love relationship, it’s about my relationship with everyone that I love. It’s not that we have fallen out, we’ve all got our lives going on and I needed to write that song so they would all hear it, because I’m not in touch with them.”

It turns out a lot of people can relate to that.

Adele’s original video was beautiful beautiful enough, in fact, that it’s been viewed over 264 million times so far.

But there’s another version of “Hello” that’s memorable and beautiful, too and it’s making us have those feelings all over again. It’s a sign language interpretation of it.

GIFs via Molly Lou Bartholomew/Vimeo.

Molly Lou Bartholomew is a professional nationally certified ASL interpreter. She shared on her YouTube channel that her “number one passion in life” is “artistic/theatrical interpreting in ASL (American Sign Language).”

We’re glad she shares her passion, because she’s sooo good.

You probably want to watch the whole thing while listening to the lyrics, right? Enjoy the feelings all over again!

It’s estimated that there are 500,000 to 2 million American Sign Language users in the U.S.

Just last week, a video of a woman named Rebecca King
uploaded to Facebook went viral. King, who is deaf, was placing her order in ASL at a Starbucks, where the barista communicated with her using ASL on the video monitor at the drive-through. The video has been viewed over 10 million times, bringing a lot of exposure to the value of communication using ASL.

Bartholomew’s stunning interpretation of “Hello” just exemplifies the beauty of the language.

Originally found athttp://www.upworthy.com/

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